Sunday, February 10, 2008

Kiss Your Treadmill Goodbye

Source CBN.com and The Cardio Free Diet

Author and weight-loss expert Jim Karas says you can kiss your treadmill goodbye. He says cardiovascular workouts burn a few calories, but far fewer than you think. From 1987-2000 the number of people exercising on treadmills increased by 900 percent, meanwhile obesity doubled. Using this and other research, Jim developed a new approach to weight-loss: The Cardio Free Diet.

Your body functions like an equation, Jim says, where we look at calories in and calories out. For too long we’ve focused on the first part of the equation when trying to lose weight. Instead, Jim notes that looking at dieting like that is what has led many people to fad dieting. We need to burn calories and interval strength training is the best way to do that for these reasons:
  1. It provides absolute enhanced heart health. It’s our heart-rate variability that counts, how fast we respond to stimuli. If we’re walking at one pace for 30 minutes on a treadmill, our heart rate is at a steady rate. That doesn’t replicate real life. “We live our lives in spurts, not marathons,” Jim says.
  2. Interval strength training provides greater flexibility.
  3. Interval strength training increases lean muscle tissue and increases metabolism. Jim says that we can lose weight doing intervals of cardio exercise also, but that cardio will not build your lean muscle tissue in the same way that interval strength training does. Jim says cardio can be detrimental. “It kills your time, your energy, your joints, and your motivation.” He says the only people who should ever do cardio are those who really enjoy it. Others should cut it out completely.


Read more more from The Cardio Free Diet include first two chapters: Cardio's Reign of Terror and The Body Weight Equation.

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Thursday, February 7, 2008

Amazing Omega-3 Eggs

Amazing Omega-3 Eggs
source The Maker's Diet by Jordan Rubin

High omega-3 eggs are nature's nearly perfect food. Eggs contain all known nutrients except for vitamin C! They are good sources of fat-soluble vitamins A and D as well as certain carotenoids that guard against free-radical damage to the body. They also contain lutein, which has been shown to prevent age-related macular degeneration. When possible, buy eggs directly from farms where the chickens are allowed to roam free and eat their natural diet, or purchase eggs marked DHA or high omega-3 eggs (they contain a healthy balance of omega-3 to omega-6). Despite the unfounded cholesterol scare during the past 15 years, eggs can be a healthy addition to anyone's diet; they can actually help reduce the risk of both heart disease and cancer.

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Monday, February 4, 2008

Stealth Health: How to Sneak Age-Defying, Disease-Fighting Habits Into Your Life Without Really Trying

Stealth Health: How to Sneak Age-Defying, Disease-Fighting Habits Into Your Life Without Really TryingStealth Health: How to Sneak Age-Defying, Disease-Fighting Habits Into Your Life Without Really Trying
By Reader's Digest


Discover The Everyday Health Plan - the simplest program available to enhance your health by promoting weight loss while increasing your energy level and strengthening you immune system. This east-to-use plan contains more than 1,200 tiny modifications to make you healthier. The ideas are fresh, unusual, simple, fast, and thoroughly researched and doctor-approved.

This book has changed my life!5
I thoroughly recommend buying this book. Its simple, easy to read guide is well organized and thought out. I've been easily incorporating the changes it recommends in my life without overwhelming me. This is a must read for anyone who wishes to de-stress their lives and add health with ease. Judea Eden

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When Calories Do -- and Don't -- Count

When Calories Do -- and Don't -- Count

Americans have a love-hate affair with calories. At any given moment, more than 4 out of 10 of us say we’re on a diet, yet we are gobbling 300 calories more each day, on average, than we did 20 years ago. And calorie counts sometimes dominate our lives: We choose workouts based on how many calories they burn, shop for calorie bargains at the grocery store, and blame holiday calories for our widening waistlines. But do we really understand when calories do -- and don’t -- put on pounds? Take this true/false test and see how you score.

1. True or False: Women trying to lose weight should eat no fewer than 1,200 calories a day.
True. It’s the lowest, yet still safe, calorie level for weight loss, says Elizabeth Somer, RD, author of 10 Habits That Mess Up a Woman’s Diet.

2. True or False: Most people have a pretty accurate idea of how many calories they consume.
False. People typically underestimate how much they eat -- sometimes by up to 700 calories a day. “But most of us tend to be off by about a third,” Somer says.

3. True or False: Excess calories go straight to your hips.
False. They go straight to wherever your genes tell them to.

4. True or False: Fat calories pack on pounds faster than carb calories.
True, if the calories are excess calories -- that is, more than your body needs.
5. True or False: Calories eaten at night are more fattening than calories consumed during the day.
False. Calories eaten at night aren’t any more fattening -- but they are more tempting.

Read more

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Saturday, February 2, 2008

Easy Ways to Lose Weight: 50+ Ideas

Look slimmer, feel trimmer! From Reader's Digest Stealth Health Simple Slimming

Spring is right around the corner and retailers have already begun stocking their floors with warm-weather goods -- including swimsuits. Besides looking great on the beach, commonsense tells us that one of the best things you can do for your overall health is to drop a few pounds. Or maybe more than a few pounds.
Being overweight significantly increases your risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer ... the list seems almost endless. Plus, if you do get sick or need surgery, being overweight can make any treatments riskier.

1. Once a week, indulge in a high-calorie-tasting, but low-calorie, treat.
2. Treat high-calorie foods as jewels in the crown.
3. After breakfast, make water your primary drink.
4. Carry a palm-size notebook everywhere you go for one week. Write down every single morsel that enters your lips -- even water.
5. Buy a pedometer, clip it to your belt, and aim for an extra 1,000 steps a day.

Books about health and diet from Reader's Digest

Read more at RD.com

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